Dark Nights, Obsidian Dreams


Ask me something  

Just another transient being.

One of the mediums I use to catalogue my thoughts.

Melbourne, Australia.


"The man of knowledge must be able not only to love his enemies but also to hate his friends."
Friedrich Nietzsche (via feellng)

(Source: feellng)

— 2 days ago with 618 notes
"I was quiet, but I was not blind."
Fanny Price, Mansfield Parki (via pnko)

(Source: bibliophilebunny, via imanopenbookinstead)

— 2 days ago with 277264 notes
"But every true god must be both organizer and destroyer."
Thomas Pynchon, Gravity’s Rainbow (via jaimelannister)
— 3 days ago with 363 notes
"We are merely a speck of the earth’s history, and we are nearly killing it. We create these marvelous machines, yet we destroy each other with judgment and hatred. We lack conviction within our own actions, but see everyone else’s as crimes. We as humans think we are grand, that nothing will eliminate our species. That’s where we are all wrong. We are our own desolation."
(via valerista)
— 3 days ago with 465 notes
"Vincent van Gogh, whose depression, some say, was likely related to temporal lobe epilepsy, famously saw and painted the world in almost unbearably vivid colors. After his nearly unsuccessful attempt to take his life by shooting himself in the gut, when asked why he should not be saved, he famously replied, “The sadness will last forever.” I imagine he was right."
Maggie Nelson, Bluets (via days-of-reading)
— 3 days ago with 557 notes
"…I hate myself for not being able to go downstairs naturally and seek comfort in numbers. I hate myself for having to sit here and be torn between I know not what within me. Here I am, a bundle of past recollections and future dreams, knotted up in a reasonably attractive bundle of flesh. I remember what this flesh has gone through; I dream of what it may go through. I record here the actions of optical nerves, of taste buds, of sensory perception. And, I think: I am but one more drop in the great sea of matter, defined, with the ability to realize my existence. Of the millions, I, too, was potentially everything at birth."
Sylvia Plath, from The Journals of Sylvia Plath (via liquidnight)
— 1 week ago with 548 notes
fyp-philosophy:

What sets the existentialist notion of despair apart from the conventional definition is that existentialist despair is a state one is in even when he isn’t overtly in despair. So long as a person’s identity depends on qualities that can crumble, he is in perpetual despair—and as there is, in Sartrean terms, no human essence found in conventional reality on which to constitute the individual’s sense of identity, despair is a universal human condition. As Kierkegaard defines it in Either/Or: “Let each one learn what he can; both of us can learn that a person’s unhappiness never lies in his lack of control over external conditions, since this would only make him completely unhappy.” In Works of Love, he said:

When the God-forsaken worldliness of earthly life shuts itself in complacency, the confined air develops poison, the moment gets stuck and stands still, the prospect is lost, a need is felt for a refreshing, enlivening breeze to cleanse the air and dispel the poisonous vapors lest we suffocate in worldliness. … Lovingly to hope all things is the opposite of despairingly to hope nothing at all. Love hopes all things – yet is never put to shame. To relate oneself expectantly to the possibility of the good is to hope. To relate oneself expectantly to the possibility of  evil is to fear. By the decision to choose hope one decides infinitely more than it seems, because it is an eternal decision. p. 246-250

fyp-philosophy:

What sets the existentialist notion of despair apart from the conventional definition is that existentialist despair is a state one is in even when he isn’t overtly in despair. So long as a person’s identity depends on qualities that can crumble, he is in perpetual despair—and as there is, in Sartrean terms, no human essence found in conventional reality on which to constitute the individual’s sense of identity, despair is a universal human condition. As Kierkegaard defines it in Either/Or: “Let each one learn what he can; both of us can learn that a person’s unhappiness never lies in his lack of control over external conditions, since this would only make him completely unhappy.” In Works of Love, he said:

When the God-forsaken worldliness of earthly life shuts itself in complacency, the confined air develops poison, the moment gets stuck and stands still, the prospect is lost, a need is felt for a refreshing, enlivening breeze to cleanse the air and dispel the poisonous vapors lest we suffocate in worldliness. … Lovingly to hope all things is the opposite of despairingly to hope nothing at all. Love hopes all things – yet is never put to shame. To relate oneself expectantly to the possibility of the good is to hope. To relate oneself expectantly to the possibility of  evil is to fear. By the decision to choose hope one decides infinitely more than it seems, because it is an eternal decision. p. 246-250

— 1 week ago with 194 notes
"I think therefore i exist"
Rene Descartes (via dangsnote)

(via dangsnote-deactivated20140829)

— 1 week ago with 5 notes
"The alternative of having versus being does not appeal to common sense. To have, so it would seem, is a normal function of our life: in order to live we must have things. Moreover, we must have things in order to enjoy them. In a culture in which the supreme goal is to have-and to have more and more-and in which one can speak of someone as “being worth a million dollars,” how can there be an alternative between having and being? On the contrary, it would seem that the very essence of being is having; that if one has nothing, one is nothing."
Erich Fromm - To Have or to Be  (via quintessentialenhancer)
— 1 week ago with 1 note
"If you don’t get what you want, you suffer; if you get what you don’t want, you suffer; even when you get exactly what you want, you still suffer because you can’t hold on to it forever. Your mind is your predicament. It wants to be free of change. Free of pain, free of the obligations of life and death. But change is law and no amount of pretending will alter that reality."
Socrates (via easybakec0ven)
— 1 week ago with 14 notes